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OUR HISTORY

At the end of World War II, in 1946, after being tutored by various glass masters, Mr. Gino Cenedese (1907-1973) – anticipating a brighter era to come – established his own glass factory in partnership with the great glass masters of the time: Alfredo Barbini, Gino Fort, Angelo Tosi and Pietro Scaramal.

Remained the sole owner after the rescission of his partners in 1949, Mr. Cenedese weaved together the thousand-year-old Venetian glass-making tradition with the creative course of the great masters of the eighteenth century, the destiny of being born on an island of glassmakers with the artistic sensitivity and the entrepreneurial courage, and the technical expertise with the vocation of excellence.

Under his management, the factory soon acquired international renown for its highly prized and exclusive glass, developing greatly and emerging as one of the most qualified of the whole island of Murano.

Though remaining closely bound to the ancient tradition of classical Murano glass – with hand blown glasses, vases, dishes, goblets and Venetian chandeliers – the production opened to the suggestions of contemporary art, pushed by a continuous research for new techniques and effects made possible by glass, and taking advantage of the collaboration with various artists and designers, each one bringing his personal interpretation of the material, colour, and light, each pieces marked out by the manual skill and the talent of the masters.

From 1953 to 1958 the collaboration with sculptor Napoleone Martinuzzi brought to life a series of female figures in solid glass and bas-relief panels that still adorn the firm’s showrooms, as well as large-sized chandeliers; while the cooperation with the painter Luigi Scarpa Croce led to the creation of “submerged” glass forms.

In the period going from 1954 to 1962, the designer Fulvio Bianconi worked with Cenedese and as a result some of his creations were exposed at the 1954 edition of the Biennale di Venezia, where Cenedese had already participated in 1952 with a thick and weighty block of glass with submerged abstract forms (reminding of a fish tank) created by the artist Riccardo Licata.

From 1963 to 1972 master glass-craftsman and artist Ermanno Nason was given freedom to work as he pleased at the factory. His production was extremely varied, pursuing – and reaching – the utmost quality and excellence, still unparalleled at present. In this period came also a collaboration with artist Harold Stevenson, who envisioned unique sculptures also inspired by the everchanging colours of the Venetian Lagoon (1968 –1969).

Subsequently the company undertook a continuing collaboration with Antonio Da Ros, a local artist fascinated by the decorative and chromatic possibilities of glass, who brought a fresh and enthusiastic approach that led to the search of unprecedented forms and chromatic effects. With Da Ros, the Sixties saw an important creation of the “submerged” glass forms among which the “Contrappunti”, fluids submerged playing on different tones of colours (works present at the various Venice Biennale Exhibitions, to many of the Milan Triennial Exhibitions and other important international exhibitions).

Ars Cenedese Murano still works today with the techniques and the art of a craft handed down through generations, creating time-less pieces destined to be unique.

Our history

Gino Cenedese_ Ermanno Nason_1968

At the end of World War II, in 1946, after being tutored by various glass masters, Mr. Gino Cenedese (1907-1973) – anticipating a brighter era to come – established his own glass factory in partnership with the great glass masters of the time: Alfredo Barbini, Gino Fort, Angelo Tosi and Pietro Scaramal.

Remained the sole owner after the rescission of his partners in 1949, Mr. Cenedese weaved together the thousand-year-old Venetian glass-making tradition with the creative course of the great masters of the eighteenth century, the destiny of being born on an island of glassmakers with the artistic sensitivity and the entrepreneurial courage, and the technical expertise with the vocation of excellence.

Under his management, the factory soon acquired international renown for its highly prized and exclusive glass, developing greatly and emerging as one of the most qualified of the whole island of Murano.

S.Marco Shop

Though remaining closely bound to the ancient tradition of classical Murano glass – with hand blown glasses, vases, dishes, goblets and Venetian chandeliers – the production opened to the suggestions of contemporary art, pushed by a continuous research for new techniques and effects made possible by glass, and taking advantage of the collaboration with various artists and designers, each one bringing his personal interpretation of the material, colour, and light, each pieces marked out by the manual skill and the talent of the masters.

From 1953 to 1958 the collaboration with sculptor Napoleone Martinuzzi brought to life a series of female figures in solid glass and bas-relief panels that still adorn the firm’s showrooms, as well as large-sized chandeliers; while the cooperation with the painter Luigi Scarpa Croce led to the creation of “submerged” glass forms.

In the period going from 1954 to 1962, the designer Fulvio Bianconi worked with Cenedese and as a result some of his creations were exposed at the 1954 edition of the Biennale di Venezia, where Cenedese had already participated in 1952 with a thick and weighty block of glass with submerged abstract forms (reminding of a fish tank) created by the artist Riccardo Licata.

Sala colonne b&w

From 1963 to 1972 master glass-craftsman and artist Ermanno Nason was given freedom to work as he pleased at the factory. His production was extremely varied, pursuing – and reaching – the utmost quality and excellence, still unparalleled at present. In this period came also a collaboration with artist Harold Stevenson, who envisioned unique sculptures also inspired by the everchanging colours of the Venetian Lagoon (1968 –1969).

Subsequently the company undertook a continuing collaboration with Antonio Da Ros, a local artist fascinated by the decorative and chromatic possibilities of glass, who brought a fresh and enthusiastic approach that led to the search of unprecedented forms and chromatic effects. With Da Ros, the Sixties saw an important creation of the “submerged” glass forms among which the “Contrappunti”, fluids submerged playing on different tones of colours (works present at the various Venice Biennale Exhibitions, to many of the Milan Triennial Exhibitions and other important international exhibitions).

Ars Cenedese Murano still works today with the techniques and the art of a craft handed down through generations, creating time-less pieces destined to be unique.